Everett Single Family Asks $1 Million

31Myrtle.jpgHow hot is the market?

The market is so hot that they can ask $1 million for an Everett single family!

The last time an Everett single family sold for a million dollars was before….make that NEVER.

Sure, this single family  comes with 8,040 square feet of living space, a breathtaking kitchen, an elevator and an indoor pool that allows for one-on-one water basketball tournaments, but are those enough features and benefits to crack a million dollar sales price in Everett? The listing brokers are hedging their marketing bets by also putting 31 Myrtle in MLS as a legal three-family, which is good because the last time an MLS listed three-family sold in Everett was NEVER.

In Boston Real Estate, It Ain’t Over ‘Til It’s Over

He might as well have been talking about Boston real estate deals.
He might as well have been talking about Boston real estate deals. (This article first appeared as a column in Banker and Tradesman)

Perhaps the lack of inventory has contributed to fewer deals falling apart, but when Yogi Berra said, “It ain’t over til it’s over,” professional experiences have taught me that he might as well have been talking about residential real estate brokering. Sure, an offer was signed, a home inspection completed, a purchase and sale agreement executed, a commitment letter received and it may look like a deal, but I’m not going to spend that commission check yet. A lot can happen in the last 24 to 48 hours before a closing, and those events can rock the deal boat or even sink it. These last few hours are like the bottom of the ninth inning, so I know it pays to keep Mariano Rivera cool and do everything possible to keep good fortune on my side.

Continued

Over-Ask Offers Go Viral in 2014

In 2014, over-ask offers are once again prolific, but can any top the over-ask offer for the ages this Cambridge home received in 2013?
In 2014, over-ask offers are once again prolific, but can any top the over-ask offer for the ages this Cambridge home received in 2013?

“Nowadays, a Hub home goes on the market and before you can add Mentos to the list price’s Coca-Cola, the home sells for a price so much higher than list that even the jaded brokerage community is surprised.” This quote is from my column in Banker and Tradesman this month which focused on how over-ask offers have gone viral in 2014. For a copy of the column, subscribe to Banker and Tradesman or email me.

 

Related: Greater Boston Condo Sales: WTF and Other Measures, Offers Above Asking Abound in Hub, This Cambridge Home Received an Over-Ask Offer for the Ages

Flipping for Profit in Massachusetts

This Dorchester condo, that looks so good, is one of many Massachusetts flips.
This Dorchester condo, that looks so good, is one of many Massachusetts flips.

Perhaps no aspect of real estate engages the public’s imagination the way “flipping” does. Buy low, sell high. FAST.

In the local real estate recovery, interest in flipping may be at an all-time high. In February, Fortune Builders, a company founded by Than Merrill, one of the stars of Flip This House on A & E, had more local radio spots than beer companies had commercials on Super Bowl Sunday. Not long after Fortune Builders left the Hub, Doug Clark, one of the stars of Flip Men, which ran two seasons on Spike TV, had free presentations in 18 regions, including nine in Massachusetts. Continued

Who Died in Here? The Website That Knows.

If you’re worried about sharing your home with the supernatural, you might want to check out www.DiedInHouse.com. The site is the brainchild of a homebuyer who had purchased a home where unbeknownst to him someone had died. He thought the death in the home should have been part of a disclosure in the transaction, but later found out that in most states such a disclosure wasn’t required. Whether a death in your dream home creeps you out or not, the financial ramifications of such an event can be scary. DiedInHouse references an AOL article which says that “stigmatized” homes can trade at resale for a 10-25% discount. For a nominal fee, DiedInHouse reviews more than 118 million records, mostly from 1990 to present, to see if someone had died in a home. The site doesn’t claim to be deadly accurate, but upon request did send me six reports of homes in Massachusetts in which their database had found deaths. 

Related: Neighborhood Ratings Site Sparks Controversy

 

Nominees for Best Real Estate Scene

 And the five nominees for best real estate scene in a movie or a television show are….

#5 – Step Brothers – Will Ferrell + Anything = Hilarity, so when Will Ferrell and his step brother John C. Reilly scheme to sabotage the marketing of their parents home, it’s hilarious.

 (To see the other four, click “Continue reading”) Continued

Harold Brown is Worth the Price of Admission

In my featured column in Curbed on February 5th, I wrote about what many of Boston’s most successful landlords and most active developers said at Bisnow’s Annual Boston Multifamily Summit.

I don’t think I spent enough time on Harold Brown, the owner of The Hamilton Company, who has 60 years in the business, 5,200 apartments and two million square feet of commercial space. He is the most outspoken member of the panels and never fails to entertain. That’s why he’s worth the price of admission. 

The Boston investor who's comments and insights are worth the price of admission.
The Boston investor whose comments and insights are worth the price of admission.

Here’s a couple of more quotes from him:

1) “I used to be called a mega-landlord or tycoon. Now they refer to me as an octogenarian.”

2) “Also micro units, I think that is the biggest joke that I have ever heard in my life….Who is going to go in to a  studio where the toilet is in the shower stall for $3000 a month when they can rent a studio from us for $16-1700…. So I think people that got micro units better start thinking about combining them for bigger units. That’s my forecast.”

Continued

Boston’s Most Notorious Landlord

Boston Magazine's January issue features my  article on Boston's most notorious landlord, "the man who made a fortune renting out the student ghetto."
Boston Magazine’s January issue features my article on Boston’s most notorious landlord, “the man who made a fortune renting out the student ghetto.”

Don’t miss my article in this month’s Boston Magazine, “Lord of the Sties.” The article profiles Boston’s most notorious landlord, “the man who made a fortune renting out the student ghetto.”

Is Anwar Faisal “the subject of undue focus” as his attorney asserted at the September 12th hearing I attended, or is it a public service to write about what is happening in the many buildings he owns in and about Boston, as one caller told me after the article published. Decide for yourself: Get Boston Magazine today or click the link.  

Ageless Investors Active in Today’s Market

Elder statesman of the Greater Boston market continue to flex their real estate muscles.
Elder statesman of the Greater Boston market continue to flex their real estate muscles.

My December column in Banker and Tradesman focused on several older Boston real estate investors (Ed Zuker, Don Chiofaro, Franklin Simon and David Zussman) who are apparently drinking from the Fountain of Youth. The last paragraph of the column was reserved for  Harold Brown, 89, who can still identify, finance and close on a real estate investment opportunity in the time it takes a Millennial to find the remote control. Email me for a copy of the column. 

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